‘The History of our Country’

 

‘The History of our Country’

The following is just one part of our study product intended to introduce you by way of what is available from the Internet with research showing all the different websites that are reporting the same thing we are. Most of these websites don’t explain in detail or are not available to provide answers to questions so that you will fully understand the truth.

Following is the part of the history of money in the Colonies before the War with England in 1776. This was the main reason for the Declaration of Independence, which was a Constructive Notice to Prove the Facts to the candid world as found within:

“To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.”

Even if you have read the Declaration of Independence please read it again because it is the starting point of our country. Its purpose was to state the facts and this is what the ‘Educational Program’ is all about facts from before this point in time and up to right now. Because history is repeating itself and you will learn that it is not by accident. Knowing the truth will help you to understand the true problem. Telling most people right now is a waste of time because we all have been lied to our whole life.

At some point I hope you can figure out who is lying to you because I don’t want you to believe me but learn the truth so that you are able to think outside of the box where we have all been trapped from the ‘Dumbing Down of America’. While doing this last Internet search I see there is a new term being added making a new set of URL for ‘Deliberate Dumbing Down’. The leader of this movement is Charlotte Iserbyt. I have talked to her on one of her radio appearances. She didn’t at that time know who our common enemy is. Most people don’t understand our common enemy and that is another chapter.

The first issue for the Colonist was the control of the supply of money and the following is an introduction of the facts as we know them. Please don’t attempt to find other information because we have already done the research. Ask any questions by replying to the one that sent you this chapter of our Educational Program. Questions will be put in a follow-up document with the answers. This is our attempt to connect as many of the facts so everyone can see what is happening today did not just start a few years ago.


Colonies More Prosperous Than The Home Country

Before the American War for Independence in 1776, the colonized part of what is today the United States of America was a possession of England. It was called New England, and was made up of 13 colonies, which became the first 13 states of the great Republic. Around 1750, this New England was very prosperous. Benjamin Franklin was able to write:

"There was abundance in the Colonies, and peace was reigning on every border. It was difficult, and even impossible, to find a happier and more prosperous nation on all the surface of the globe. Comfort was prevailing in every home. The people, in general, kept the highest moral standards, and education was widely spread."

When Benjamin Franklin went over to England to represent the interests of the Colonies, he saw a completely different situation: the working population of this country was gnawed by hunger and poverty. "The streets are covered with beggars and tramps," he wrote. He asked his English friends how England, with all its wealth, could have so much poverty among its working classes.

His friends replied that England was a prey to a terrible condition: it had too many workers! The rich said they were already overburdened with taxes, and could not pay more to relieve the needs and poverty of this mass of workers. Several rich Englishmen of that time actually believed, along with Mathus, that wars and plague were necessary to rid the country from man-power surpluses.

Franklin's friends then asked him how the American Colonies managed to collect enough money to support their poor houses, and how they could overcome this plague of pauperism. Franklin replied:

"We have no poor houses in the Colonies; and if we had some, there would be nobody to put in them, since there is, in the Colonies, not a single unemployed person, neither beggars nor tramps."

The following historical story is taken from a radio address given by Congressman Charles G. Binderup of Nebraska, some 50 years ago and was reprinted in Un-robing the Ghosts of Wall Street:

Colonies More Prosperous Than The Home Country

Before the American War for Independence in 1776, the colonized part of what is today the United States of America was a possession of England. It was called New England, and was made up of 13 colonies, which became the first 13 states of the great Republic. Around 1750, this New England was very prosperous. Benjamin Franklin was able to write:

“There was abundance in the Colonies, and peace was reigning on every border. It was difficult, and even impossible, to find a happier and more prosperous nation on all the surface of the globe. Comfort was prevailing in every home. The people, in general, kept the highest moral standards, and education was widely spread.”

When Benjamin Franklin went over to England to represent the interests of the Colonies, he saw a completely different situation: the working population of this country was gnawed by hunger and poverty. “The streets are covered with beggars and tramps,” he wrote. He asked his English friends how England, with all its wealth, could have so much poverty among its working classes.

His friends replied that England was a prey to a terrible condition: it had too many workers! The rich said they were already overburdened with taxes, and could not pay more to relieve the needs and poverty of this mass of workers. Several rich Englishmen of that time actually believed, along with Mathus, that wars and plague were necessary to rid the country from man-power surpluses.

Franklin’s friends then asked him how the American Colonies managed to collect enough money to support their poor houses, and how they could overcome this plague of pauperism. Franklin replied:

“We have no poor houses in the Colonies; and if we had some, there would be nobody to put in them, since there is, in the Colonies, not a single unemployed person, neither beggars nor tramps.”

Thanks To Free Money Issued By The Nation

His friends could not believe their ears, and even less understand this fact, since when the English poor houses and jails became too cluttered, England shipped these poor wretches and down-and- outs, like cattle, and discharged, on the quays of the Colonies, those who had survived the poverty, dirtiness and privations of the journey. At that time, England was throwing into jail those who could not pay their debts. They therefore asked Franklin how he could explain the remarkable prosperity of the New England Colonies. Franklin replied:

“That is simple. In the Colonies, we issue our own paper money. It is called ‘Colonial Scrip.’ We issue it in proper proportion to make the goods and pass easily from the producers to the consumers. In this manner, creating ourselves our own paper money, we control its purchasing power and we have no interest to pay to no one.”

The Bankers Impose Poverty

The information came to the knowledge of the English Bankers, and held their attention. They immediately took the necessary steps to have the British Parliament to pass a law that prohibited the Colonies from using their scrip money, and then ordered them to use only the gold and silver money that was provided in sufficient quantity by the English bankers. Then began in America the plague of debt-money, which has never since brought so many curses to the American people.

The first law was passed in 1751, and then completed by a more restrictive law in 1763. Franklin reported that one year after the implementation of this prohibition on Colonial money, the streets of the Colonies were filled with unemployment and beggars, just like in England, because there was not enough money to pay for the goods and work. The circulating medium of exchange had been reduced by half.

Franklin added that this was the original cause of the American Revolution – and not the tax on tea nor the Stamp Act, as it has been taught again and again in history books. The financiers always manage to have removed from school books all that can throw light on their own schemes, and damage the glow that protects their power.

Franklin, who was one of the chief architects of the American independence, wrote it clearly:

“The Colonies would gladly have borne the little tax on tea and other matters had it not been the poverty caused by the bad influence of the English bankers on the Parliament, which has caused in the Colonies hatred of England and the Revolutionary War.”

This point of view of Franklin was confirmed by great statesmen of his era: John Adams, Jefferson, and several others. A remarkable English historian, John Twells, wrote, speaking of the money of the Colonies, the Colonial Scrip:

“It was the monetary system under which America’s Colonies flourished to such an extent that Edmund Burke was able to write about them: ‘Nothing in the history of the world resembles their progress. It was a sound and beneficial system, and its effects led to the happiness of the people.’”

John Twells adds:

“In a bad hour, the British Parliament took away from America its representative money, forbade any further issue of bills of credit, these bills ceasing to be legal tender, and ordered that all taxes should be paid in coins. Consider now the consequences: this restriction of the medium of exchange paralyzed all the industrial energies of the people. Ruin took place in these once flourishing Colonies; most rigorous distress visited every family and every business, discontent became desperation, and reached a point, to use the words of Dr. Johnson, when human nature rises up and assets its rights.”

Another writer, Peter Cooper, expresses himself along the same lines. After having said how Franklin had explained to the London Parliament the cause of the prosperity of the Colonies, he wrote:

“After Franklin gave explanations on the true cause of the prosperity of the Colonies, the Parliament exacted laws forbidding the use of this money in the payment of taxes. This decision brought so many drawbacks and so much poverty to the people that it was the main cause of the Revolution. The suppression of the Colonial money was a much more important reason for the general uprising than the Tea and Stamp Act.”

Today, in America as well as in Europe, we are under the regime of the Scrip of the Bankers instead of the scrip of the nation. Hence the public debts, everlasting interest charges, taxes that plunder purchasing power, with the only result being a consolidation of the financial dictatorship.

There is only one cure for America’s ultimate financial collapse and that is for Congress to exercise Clause 30 of the “Federal” Reserve Act, buy the outstanding shares of stock, shut down this unconstitutional system and sell off their assets to reimburse the people of this nation for this unspeakable theft of their wealth. This is the first installment of postings on this issue, new ones will be put up as soon as manpower allows.

Copyright © 1941 by Congressman Charles G. Binderup [Internet search]

BINDERUP, Charles Gustav, a Representative from Nebraska; born in Horsens, Denmark, March 5, 1873; when six months old immigrated to the United States with his parents, who settled on a farm near Hastings, Adams County, Nebr.; attended the county schools and Grand Island (Nebr.) Business College; engaged in agricultural pursuits near Hastings and Minden, Nebr., and also in the mercantile and creamery business at Minden, Nebr.; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-fourth and Seventy-fifth Congresses (January 3, 1935-January 3, 1939); was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1938 to the Seventy-sixth Congress and for election as an Independent in 1940 to the Seventy-seventh Congress; organized and was active in the Constitutional Money League of America in Minden, Nebr., until his death; died in Minden, Nebr., August 19, 1950; interment in Minden Cemetery.



Other study course titles:

The reason that we are doing what we are doing is bigger than just the Banking Fraud

Currently we are updating and having them looked over by one of our students that wants what we want!

The reason for starting this educational study course was first prompted by all the foreclosures. Each and every one of them needs an hands-on education because they are in foreclosure while many other are just about to be foreclosed on. Each of them are in a different stage and we will not have time to cover the reasons why this all happened to so many follow Americans. If you are reading this you have to understand ‘collectively’ we can change things so we would be able to return to the good times like the Colonist were before 1750:

‘Nothing in the history of the world resembles their progress. It was a sound and beneficial system, and its effects led to the happiness of the people.’

"There was abundance in the Colonies, and peace was reigning on every border. It was difficult, and even impossible, to find a happier and more prosperous nation on all the surface of the globe. Comfort was prevailing in every home. The people, in general, kept the highest moral standards, and education was widely spread."

"We have no poor houses in the Colonies; and if we had some, there would be nobody to put in them, since there is, in the Colonies, not a single unemployed person, neither beggars nor tramps."



Then it was all over when “The Bankers Impose Poverty”!

Today, in America as well as in Europe, we are under the regime of the Scrip of the Bankers instead of the scrip of the nation. Hence the public debts, everlasting interest charges, taxes that plunder purchasing power, with the only result being a consolidation of the financial dictatorship.

Reference websites: 1643 - The beginning of our Country; 1652 - COLONIAL MONEY

NEW ENGLAND COINAGE  Real Money

By 1652, the problem resulting from a shortage of coins had become extreme. England had turned a deaf ear to the colonists' plea for specie, and the colonial leaders did not believe that the people should have to continue using the mixture of foreign coins, wampum, bullets, and barter objects any longer. In an effort to provide more good coin to further trade and commerce, the Massachusetts Bay Colony established an illegal mint in Boston in 1652.

1764 - The Currency Act - The Colonies are ordered to stop printing paper money;

1781

United States Banking began in 1781 with an act of United States Congress that established the Bank of North America in Philadelphia. During the American Revolutionary War, the Bank of North America was given a monopoly on currency; prior to this time, private banks printed their own bank notes, backed by deposits of gold and/or

1790

Alexander Hamilton proposes a Bank of the United States.

Hamilton states: “A bank has a natural relation to the power of collecting taxes - to that of regulating trade - to that of providing for the common defense... [Therefore] the incorporation of a bank is a constitutional measure...

December 16
Patrick Henry opposes the National bank because it is unconstitutional.

1791

February 25 - President Washington asks his cabinet members for opinions on the National Bank.

Thomas Jefferson submitted, “The incorporation of a bank, and the powers assumed by this bill, have not, in my opinion, been delegated to the United States by the Constitution.” and would also violate the yet to be ratified 10th Amendment.

Alexander Hamilton submitted that Congress's power to collect taxes, was also power to create a national bank. Not convinced by either side, Washington sided with Hamilton, as it was Hamilton's job as Secretary of the Treasury to know what he was doing.

1791

December 12 - The Bank of the United States opens its doors in Philadelphia.

1793

January 21 - Hamilton and the National Bank are accused of corruption and mismanagement. Opponents to the National Bank call for the demise of the unconstitutional Bank. Congress fails to act.

1811

February 20 - Congress refuses to let the National Bank renew its Charter on the grounds that the Bank is unconstitutional.

March 4 - The Bank of the United States is dissolved.

1815

Letter from Thomas Jefferson to James Monroe, January 1, 1815 — “All these doubts and fears prove only the extent of the dominion which the banking institutions have obtained over the minds of our citizens, and especially of those inhabiting cities or other banking places ;  and this dominion must be broken, or it will break us.”

If the American People ever allow the banks to control the issuance of their currency, first by inflation and then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their fathers occupied. The issuing power of money should be taken from the bankers and restored to Congress and the people to whom it belongs. I sincerely believe the banking institutions having the issuing power of money are more dangerous to liberty than standing armies. Quotes of the Founding Fathers on Banks

We are completely saddled and bridled, and the bank is so firmly mounted on us that we must go where they ill guide.

The dominion which the banking institutions have obtained over the minds of our citizens...must be broken, or it will break us.

January 20 - President Madison vetoes a bill that would create a second National Bank.

1816

January 8 - Faced with financial hardship from the War of 1812, Congress proposes a 2nd National Bank. The Bill also allows the President to suspend hard currency.

March 14 - The 2nd National Bank gets Congressional approval.

1832

January 9 - The 2nd National Bank applies for its Charter renewal 4 years early.

July 10 - President Jackson vetoes the Bank's recharter on the grounds that the Bank is unconstitutional.

1835

January - With the National Bank powerless, Jackson successfully pays off the nations debt leaving the U.S. with a surplus of $5,000.

1836  INFLATION!

July 11 - Paper money results in tremendous inflation in property value. President Jackson issues a Specie Circular mandating that land payments be made with gold and silver.


1900

Over 90% of the population was self-employed

NO central bank in America since 1832

NO income tax on the Citizens - Congressional Findings

Gold & Silver was the ONLY lawful coin

Government services are paid for by EXCISE TAXES

Early 1900 - Entrepreneurs want to expand and buy other companies, creating new lending opportunities for New York bankers. The most powerful and wealthy of these entrepreneurs are called Robber Barons. (The Robber Barons (book), a 1934 book about the American industrialists by Matthew Josephson. Internet search)

1921

Henry Ford, Sr. stated that if we removed the power of money from the banklords that we would stop all wars.

1928

Louis T. McFadden charges that members of the Federal Reserve arbitrarily and unlawfully taken over $80,000,000,000 (80 Billion) from the United States Government in the year 1928. Read the rest of the charges here.

1968

Federal Reserve Notes no longer redeemable for "lawful money."